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InfinityPages makes it easy to expand your web presence for product launches, announcements, and more.

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Whether you’re running a mom-and-pop bakery, a laundry pickup service, an ecommerce empire, or practically any other business, having a prominent web presence is important. But for some businesses, that means more than just having a company website. Being able to create multiple landing pages for products, announcements, special promotions, and myriad other reasons can help your business better cater to specific customers and run more customized marketing and acquisition campaigns. One of the most budget-friendly ways to do that is with InfinityPages.

InfinityPages specializes in letting you build fully-custom landing pages in just seconds. Their intuitive drag-and-drop builder makes it easy to design your page exactly how you’d like it and push it live fast without needing developers or designers. With professional templates, elements, widgets, forms, and more, InfinityPages gives you a starting-off point, and then complete control over your landing pages. Once your landing page is built and launched, InfinityPages hosts pages on their cloud servers with 99.9% uptime, ensuring your customers have the best browsing experience possible. Plus, they give you an accurate analytics center for tracking your pages and various campaigns.

With InfinityPages, there’s no limit to the number of sites or pages you can build, nor is there a limit on the number of elements you can use in your pages. You can add integrations like chat widgets, custom embeds, email opt-in forms, and much, much more. You can even download your websites as many times as you’d like for future reference. InfinityPages helps you learn more about your users, all while better connecting with them and driving engagement.

If you want to add to your company’s web presence, landing pages are a great tool. A lifetime subscription to InfinityPages’ Startup Plan is normally $300, but you can get one today for just $39.99.

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Cybercrimes are on the rise with hackers and scammers chomping at the bit for a shot at your system. There’s one tool that should be on all computers.

IBM Security, Packet Clearing House and The Global Cyber Alliance have a free service to protect you from accessing sketchy websites that spread malware, steal personal information and engage in fraudulent activity. Tap or click here to use this free security tool on your Windows or Mac computers.

But hackers may have already compromised your network. Tap or click here for a free test to see if your router has been hacked.

1. Keep everything up to date

Security threats are continually evolving, which is why you need to keep your browser updated. Updates help protect you from the latest spreading viruses and attacks. Tap or click here to find out if you are using the latest version of your browser.

Even more important, update your operating system regularly. Windows releases frequent (though sometimes buggy) updates and missing any can mean severe consequences for your security. The same goes for Macs.

Most Windows PCs download and install updates automatically by default. If you haven’t changed your automatic update settings, you might not need to change a thing. If you’ve turned automatic updates off, you can update manually.

Apple’s macOS receives its updates through the Mac App Store. Open the App Store app, click Updates. Tap Update to download and install.

2. Test your firewall

Even if cybercriminals can see your network, a firewall helps to prevent them from getting inside and doing any damage. Make sure your firewall is on.

For Windows, open Settings > Update & Security. Choose Windows Security from the left-hand menu. Choose Firewall & Network Protection to open the firewall menu.

Your system will tell you whether your firewall is on or not. If it’s off, you can toggle it on or reset the settings to default by clicking on Restore firewalls to default.

For Mac, open System Preferences, then click Security and Privacy. Click the Lock Icon to make changes and enter your admin username and password. Then select Turn on Firewall.

One more important step

Tap or click here to test that your firewall is actually working. These port scans will make sure you’re keeping bad actors out of your system.

3. Remove extra browser add-ons and hosts files in Windows

Most browser extensions are safe-to-use tools that enhance your internet experience, but some are malicious. Regularly comb through your list of extensions and remove any you don’t recognize or don’t use anymore.

In Chrome: Visit the Chrome Web Store menu to see a list of all your currently installed extensions. Remove them by clicking Remove from Chrome. Click the Library tab and delete the extension from there as well.

In Firefox: Click on the three-line menu button and click Add-ons, followed by Extensions. Scroll through the list of extensions and click the three-dot icon next to the extensions you want to remove. Select Remove to delete them from your browser.

In Safari: Choose Safari > Preferences, then click Extensions. To turn off an extension, deselect its checkbox. To uninstall an extension, select the extension and click the Uninstall button.

Tip in a Tip: When it comes to browsers, some are better than others. Tap or click here for a comparison of Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Edge and Tor.

Windows users should check the hosts file to see if attackers have made any unusual configurations. This file can override your DNS and redirect URLs to different locations, like malicious websites.

Type the Window Key + R on your keyboard and paste C:WindowsSystem32driversetchosts into it.

In the pop-up menu that appears, select Notepad to open the file. Scroll through and note any unusual or garbled looking text. Copy the data contained here into another text document as a backup, and delete the unusual entries. Click File, then Save to make the changes.

4. See who else is using your Wi-Fi

Network intruders can slow down your internet speed and interfere with your data. It’s worth knowing who else might be logged in and using it.

To see all the devices connected to your network, open your router’s settings menu. To do this, type your IP address into the address bar of your web browser. You can usually find this address on the sticker attached to the bottom of your router, but most use the default address of 192.168.1.1.

Or you can tap or click here for a handy website that lists default IP addresses for thousands of different routers.

Then, log in with your username and password. This is the default username and password for your router or a unique login you created when you set it up. If you’re unsure what your login is, you can call your ISP for assistance.

When you’re logged into your router settings, look for an option that looks like “Attached Devices, “Connected Devices” or “Client List.” It shows you all the devices using your connection.

Scroll through the list and note anything that you don’t recognize. Usually, you can kick them off from this menu as well.

SAVE SOME CASH: You’re probably paying more than you need to for internet. Tap or click here for seven smart ways to lower your monthly bill.

5. Hide your Wi-Fi network from public view

By default, your router broadcasts its network name (SSID) for you and your guests to find easily. This also means anyone looking for your network can attempt to join. You can stop it from broadcasting its connection, so only people who know your router’s exact name can attempt to join.

To do this, log into your router’s settings and locate the menu for wireless settings. Look for the broadcasting option for your SSID, which is most often enabled by default. Toggle that option off.

Make sure you write down your SSID before disabling the broadcast. Otherwise, you might find yourself locked out of your network.

With a little work, you can make your network a whole lot safer. My advice? Take some time to secure your connection. Your future self will thank you.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

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Cybercriminals could trace your device or access sensitive personal data through contact-tracing apps built for the coronavirus pandemic, a new report says.

In a report released Thursday, cybersecurity firm Check Point noted that U.S. developers are working on contact tracing apps that measure Bluetooth signal strength to detect the distance between device users. The basic idea is, if two devices are close enough, within 6 feet, an infected user could potentially transmit the virus. If somebody is infected, other app users would be notified and could self-quarantine and get tested.

GPS can also be used to determine location. This approach allows health authorities to analyze the geography of the infection spread and take preventative measures. MIT’s SafePaths app, for example, uses GPS technology.

IRS WARNS ON CONTINUING COVID-19 SCAMS, AS $30B IN STIMULUS PAYMENTS COULD BE STOLEN

Checkpoint researchers laid out a number of concerns about the apps, including issues with the following:

  • Bluetooth: If not implemented correctly, hackers can trace a person’s device by matching devices and the “identification packets” they send out.
  • GPS: If GPS is used, it can give away sensitive information, revealing where users are traveling and their location during previous days or weeks.
  •  Personal data: Apps store contact logs, encryption keys and other sensitive data on devices. This data could be vulnerable if not encrypted and stored in the application “sandbox.”
  • There is also a danger that identity could be exposed if phone number, name or other identifying data is associated with a tracing app.

“The jury is still out on how safe contact tracing apps are. After initial review, we have some serious concerns,” Jonathan Shimonovich, Manager of Mobile Research at Check Point, said in a statement.

“Contact tracing apps must maintain a delicate balance between privacy and security, since poor implementation of security standards may put users’ data at risk,” he added.

YOU MIGHT WANT TO CHANGE YOUR PASSWORD AFTER THIS SHOCKING STUDY

Google and Apple made news in April when they announced a framework based on Bluetooth for registration of contact events. Each device generates keys to send to nearby devices and the devices store the contact IDs locally.

According to the framework, if a user decides to report a positive diagnosis of COVID-19 to their app, they will be added to the positive diagnosis list – managed by a public health authority – so that other users who came into range of the infected person’s Bluetooth “beacons” can be alerted.

Check Point has offered some pointers on how you can protect yourself from exposing your data:

  • Install apps from reputable stores only such as the App Store and Google Play Store. Those stores only allow authorized government agencies to publish such apps.
  • Use mobile security: install mobile security software to scan applications and protect the device against malware. 

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