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Video-streaming service Twitch on Monday became the latest social platform to crack down on posts by President Trump and his campaign. The only difference? The suspension of Trump’s Twitch account will change relatively little.

The service, which is popular among video gamers, said that it had temporarily banned Trump’s account on Monday for posting hateful comments and had also removed the “offending content.”

“Like anyone else, politicians on Twitch must adhere to our Terms of Service and Community Guidelines,” Twitch said in a statement. “We do not make exceptions for political or newsworthy content and will take action on content reported to us that violates our rules.”

But Twitch, which is owned by Amazon, declined to comment on how long Trump’s suspension would last. It also declined to say how many people actually watched Trump’s streams on the service, which typically features video gamers competing against each other.

Since 2019, Trump’s account has been used to broadcast live campaign rallies and rerun older rallies, Twitch said.

The news comes as social media companies like Twitter and Facebook face rising scrutiny about hate speech and misinformation on their services. Twitter was the first to crack down, flagging and obscuring a handful of Trump’s tweets that violated its rules. Facebook, for a while, took a more hands-off approach, but on Friday said it had created new rules to hold politicians more accountable for what they said on the service.

Facebook’s decision to leave Trump’s posts untouched has spurred internal unrest and, most recently, an ad boycott by dozens of large customers. Big name brands like Adidas, Levi’s, Honda, and Hershey’s have all joined that campaign, called #StopHateForProfit, to pressure Facebook into doing more to police hate speech.

Twitch cited two posts by Trump that broke the rules. The first was a rebroadcast of Trump’s 2015 campaign kickoff, during which he said people coming from Mexico were “bringing drugs,” and were “rapists.” Another video show was from Trump’s recent rally in Tulsa, Okla., during which he referred to a home break-in of a young woman, calling the perpetrator a “very tough hombre.”

Twitch has a “zero-tolerance” policy for hateful conduct, which prohibits discrimination and harassment of others based on characteristics including race, religion, gender, age, and sexual orientation. The company’s rules say that it will “consider a number of factors to determine the intent and context of any reported hateful content,” and that enforcement actions could include “indefinite suspension.”

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The European Union moved closer to recommending that travelers from the U.S. shouldn’t be allowed to enter the bloc even after July 1, according to a draft decision being considered by governments.

Diplomats have agreed on a provisional list of 15 countries, including Canada, Japan, Australia and South Korea, that should be allowed into the EU because their level of new Covid-19 cases meets the bloc’s safety criteria, according to a draft seen by Bloomberg. Chinese residents will also be allowed to visit the EU, on the condition that Beijing confirms that it will also allow European citizens to travel to China, according to the document. 

Following a meeting of EU ambassadors in Brussels that dragged late into Friday evening, the bloc’s governments have been asked to indicate by Saturday afternoon whether they agree on the proposed text, so that a formal decision can be taken.

The potential decision to extend a ban on incoming visits from the U.S. and Russia, while allowing travel from China could have geopolitical implications. Transatlantic relations have taken a series of hits, from trade to foreign policy. European diplomats are braced for President Donald Trump to take unkindly to Americans being kept away, while the Chinese are allowed in.

Reciprocity

The EU seeks a common approach on the criteria for allowing non-essential travelers back into the bloc as the coronavirus crisis subsides on the continent and governments start easing border controls. Nations are trying to revive domestic economies as the summer tourist season gets underway while guarding against a second wave of infections.

The initial restrictions on leisure travel from outside Europe were introduced in mid-March for 30 days and extended three times through end-June as Europe battled to contain the pandemic. Once the list is agreed upon it will likely be updated every two weeks, said one official, who asked not to be identified because the discussions are private.

One of the agreed criteria includes “reciprocity,” meaning that the EU won’t allow incoming travelers from countries which have barred European citizens from entering. Another condition when deciding whom to bar is the rate of new Covid-19 cases, according to another internal document seen by Bloomberg.

Under one proposed criterion, travelers will only be allowed from countries with a comparable or better epidemiological situation than the average in the EU. Deliberations on the conditions have been painstakingly slow, as the extension of travel bans from the U.S. and Russia will strip many tourism-dependent economies in the continent from two major markets.

EU-U.S. Talks

Earlier this week, Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government’s top infectious-disease expert, told Congress he was seeing a “disturbing surge” in new cases. Florida reported 122,960 Covid-19 cases on Friday, up 7.8% from a day earlier, compared with an average increase of 4.1% in the previous seven days. The one-day increase of 8,942 was the most ever.

Secretary of State Michael Pompeo has said that the U.S. is working with the EU over how to restart travel between the two regions.

The U.S. doesn’t want to reopen in a way that “jeopardizes the United States from people traveling here and we certainly don’t want to cause problems anyplace else,” Pompeo told reporters Wednesday. He said he was confident a solution could be figured out in the coming weeks.

More coronavirus coverage from Fortune:

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  • George Floyd protests, coronavirus face masks pose challenges for facial recognition
  • The enduring history of health care inequality for black Americans
  • E-book reading is booming during the coronavirus pandemic

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This is the web version of Eastworld, Fortune’s newsletter focused on business and technology in Asia. Subscribe here to get future editions in your inbox.

On Monday, U.S. President Donald Trump clipped the wings of one of his fiercest China hawks after the aide’s assertion that the U.S.-China trade deal is “over” sent markets into a tailspin.

The aide, White House trade adviser Peter Navarro, offered the bleak assessment in an interview with Fox News. Within hours he was scrambling to walk it back. Trump himself took to Twitter to reassure investors that the China deal is “fully intact.”

The exchange highlights the administration’s increasing difficulty in convincing voters Trump is serious about “getting tough” with China—without roiling markets or torpedoing the “phase one” trade pact the two countries signed in January.

Trump, trailing badly in the polls, has come under new pressure to “stand up” to China since the publication last week of the tell-all memoir by his former national security advisor, John Bolton.

Bolton alleges that, in his meetings with Chinese President Xi Jinping, Trump fawned over his counterpart as the “greatest leader in Chinese history” and “pleaded” for Xi to ramp up soybean imports from states Trump must carry to win re-election.

Trump disputes Bolton’s account and has blasted his former aide as a “liar.” But in the past week, the administration has gone to extraordinary lengths to burnish Trump’s anti-China bona fides.

At rallies in Oklahoma and Arizona, Trump lambasted China for America’s economic woes and referred to the coronavirus several times using an ugly racist slur.

Trump’s China hawks are taking wing. On Wednesday, Trump’s current national security advisor, Robert O’Brien, assailed China’s leadership in stark rhetoric reminiscent of the Cold War. “America, under President Trump’s leadership, has finally awoken to the threat the Chinese Communist Party’s actions pose to our way of life,” he said.

Washington Post columnist Josh Rogin reports that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Attorney General William Barr and FBI Director Christopher Wray also plan tough China speeches in the coming weeks, and each of their agencies is pushing new initiatives to confront Beijing. Trump has floated the idea of inviting India, Australia, South Korea, and Brazil to join the Group of Seven countries in a kind of “counter-China coalition” meeting parallel to the upcoming summit. On Thursday, Pompeo surprised officials in Brussels by announcing that the U.S. had accepted a proposal to create a new U.S.-European Union dialogue on China.

Those efforts come as U.S. lawmakers from both parties clamor for greater restrictions on America’s economic relationship with China. The Senate last month approved a bill that could force mainland companies to delist from U.S. stock exchanges if they fail to comply with U.S. regulations. On Thursday, the Senate passed legislation that would impose sanctions on people or companies supporting efforts by China’s national government to undermine the autonomy of Hong Kong.

Sponsors of yesterday’s bill said it was a response to Beijing’s decision to impose a new security law on Hong Kong via China’s national parliament, bypassing Hong Kong’s legislature. Passed by unanimous consent, it includes sanctions on banks that do business with anyone supporting efforts to restrict Hong Kong’s autonomy, potentially barring violators from dealing with American counterparts and limiting their access to U.S. dollar transactions. To become law, it must also pass the House of Representatives and be signed by Trump.

In the escalating conflict between the world’s two largest economies, Hong Kong increasingly finds itself caught in the middle. Earlier this month, Trump vowed to revoke Hong Kong’s preferential treatment as a separate customs and travel territory from the rest of China. Sor far, the White House has offered no details on the change.

But Hong Kong may prove to be a windfall beneficiary of efforts to deprive Chinese companies of access to U.S. capital markets. Hong Kong Stock Exchange CEO Charles Li says the exchange is seeing “tremendous interest” from Chinese companies exploring secondary listings in Hong Kong. As Fortune‘s Eamon Barrett and Naomi Xu Elegant explain, the financial impact of that “emigration” of mainland companies to Hong Kong could be enormous—and will likely enhance’s Hong Kong stature as a global financial capital, possibly at the expense of American investors.

This week’s Eastworld Spotlight conversation with Jennifer Zhu Scott, founding partner of Radian Capital and past co-chair of the Fortune Global Tech Forum, explores how China’s push for a central bank digital currency is fueled at least in part by fears that the America’s China hawks eventually will seek to impose financial sanctions as well as trade sanctions against China—or even cut it off from the global payments system.

More Eastworld news below.

Clay Chandler
clay.chandler@fortune.com

This edition of Eastworld was curated and produced by Grady McGregor. Reach him at grady.mcgregor@fortune.com.

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© 2020 Fortune Media IP Limited. All Rights Reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy (Your California Privacy Rights) | CCPA Do Not Sell My Information | Ad Choices 
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In the days following the killing of George Floyd by a white police officer and the nationwide protests that ensued, Voto Latino, an organization that encourages young Latinx voters to become more politically involved, saw a more than 2,750% jump in its voter registration numbers. 

Between June 1 and 10, the organization signed up 63,158 new voters. During the first 10 days in May, the group had registered just 2,294 people. 

“Our job at Voto Latino is talking to the individuals that have been protesting on the streets for the past weeks because those are the young people that are going to be the largest generation of our life,” Voto Latino CEO Maria Teresa Kumar told Fortune. “We’ve never seen a generation so large. It’s 12 million potential more voters than baby boomers, and we have to recognize that the system hasn’t been feeding them and addressing their core issues.”

The organization has always been online, which has aided in its success during times when in-person voter registration drives are largely impossible. “We started as digital natives, and we are in the most intimate spaces that these young people are in. We’re on their phones through their Instagrams and social platforms. We’ve been experimenting on TikTok and Tinder and getting the word out, and they’re reciprocating by signing up,” Kumar said. 

She pointed to a project done in conjunction with Google where Voto Latino showed 200,000 YouTube viewers a 13-second pre-roll advertisement telling them to register to vote followed by another six-second video at the end of the clip. The people who saw the treatment were nine times as likely to search for words that involved voter registration, and about 10,000 of them actually registered to vote. 

“What that tells us is that nobody is targeting the Latino community, but when we break it down, it’s easy to, and they’re receptive,” she said. “They want to participate, but most people don’t reach out to young voters, because there’s still this idea that they don’t vote. In the Latino community we’re carrying the water for our families. We’re not only receptive, we’re responsible for the information that we give to our elders, so you want to make sure that we’re doing something impactful.”

Voto Latino currently reaches about 8.5 million people each month using social media and uses the platform to educate its community about voting issues. The organization has also cultivated a community of activists who have started to run for office. Gregorio Casar, the youngest city councilman in Austin’s history, was trained by Voto Latino, as was Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. “They did these trainings and realized they could be active voters and be in office,” said Kumar. 

The organization’s digital footprint has been felt most in Texas. As voter registration in the state flatlined owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, Voto Latino has managed to add 53,093 new names to the rolls this month alone. Harris County, which encompasses Houston and is the most populated county in the state of Texas, recorded just 1,451 new voters between March 15th and May 15th of this year. Voto Latino says they they’ve signed up 9,106 new voters in the county in June alone. 

“There’s 2.5 million unregistered Latino youth in Texas who are out on the street with grievances that stretch far and wide,” said Kumar. “It’s Pollyannaish to assume that this isn’t going to be one of the most challenging elections to convince people that we have to change, but COVID has also touched every corner of American life and exposed our social inequities where I do believe that people are ready for change.”

Texas, which in recent years has gone from ruby red to purple in its voting, will be a hotly contested state in the November elections. President Donald Trump visited this week to hold a campaign dinner, and Joe Biden was there earlier in the week to meet with the family of George Floyd.

“It’s crucial to register young Latinos and get them to turn out,” said 2020 presidential candidate and Voto Latino senior adviser Julián Castro. “I think first and foremost this is crucial to improving the economic outcomes and life of people in the state…And the impact, I believe, is that when those registered young Latinos make their choices at the ballot box, that the state is going to turn blue. It’s going to transition over the years.” 

Trump is currently polling ahead of Biden in Texas by just 1.5 points. He won the state by nine points in 2016.

“The majority of Democrats, if they’re registered to vote, they’re going to go out, and they’re going to vote,” said Kumar. Voto Latino officially backed Biden for President this year—the first time they’ve endorsed a political candidate. 

“When we endorsed Joe Biden it wasn’t easy, because we had a lot of come-to-Jesus moments even internally at our office because so many people were concerned,” she said. “But…our job is to bring the community along because the stakes couldn’t be higher for the Latino community.” 

Kumar pointed to a new office created by Trump’s Department of Justice to denaturalize immigrants in the U.S. “That’s obscene,” she said. “One out of 10 voters that are going to be able to cast a ballot in November are naturalized citizens. I’m a naturalized citizen. Our job is to say, ‘We know how the system works. We need your participation. Ask us any question as raw as it is, and we will try to provide you guidance, because what we need right now is for you to show up in November for yourself and for your family.’” 

Voto Latino, meanwhile, is fighting a narrative that younger voters, who tend to vote blue, aren’t excited about Joe Biden’s candidacy and may not come out to the polls this November.

“Oftentimes they say that the system is rigged. I’d say, ‘No—the system works just as it should for the people who occupy it.’ Our job is to make sure that the young people occupy the voting booth,” said Kumar. 

More politics coverage from Fortune:

  • Joe Biden makes Facebook’s lax moderation policy a campaign issue
  • What U.S. police spending looks like in 3 charts
  • This is what people mean when they say they want to defund the police
  • Photos: In city squares and parks outside U.S. embassy buildings, Black Lives Matter protests go global
  • WATCH: Protests for George Floyd from around the U.S.

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© 2020 Fortune Media IP Limited. All Rights Reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy (Your California Privacy Rights) | CCPA Do Not Sell My Information | Ad Choices 
FORTUNE is a trademark of Fortune Media IP Limited, registered in the U.S. and other countries. FORTUNE may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice.
Quotes delayed at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Interactive Data. ETF and Mutual Fund data provided by Morningstar, Inc. Dow Jones Terms & Conditions: http://www.djindexes.com/mdsidx/html/tandc/indexestandcs.html.
S&P Index data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Terms & Conditions. Powered and implemented by Interactive Data Managed Solutions. | EU Data Subject Requests

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